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 DRAHON BALL Z ULTIMATE TENAKAICHI

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PostSubject: DRAHON BALL Z ULTIMATE TENAKAICHI   Thu Sep 08, 2011 10:45 pm






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PostSubject: Re: DRAHON BALL Z ULTIMATE TENAKAICHI   Sun Sep 11, 2011 6:17 am

sorry ppl i miss spell dragon



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PostSubject: Re: DRAHON BALL Z ULTIMATE TENAKAICHI   Sun Sep 11, 2011 6:21 am





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PostSubject: Re: DRAHON BALL Z ULTIMATE TENAKAICHI   Sun Sep 11, 2011 6:29 am







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PostSubject: Re: DRAHON BALL Z ULTIMATE TENAKAICHI   Sun Sep 11, 2011 6:37 am




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PostSubject: Re: DRAHON BALL Z ULTIMATE TENAKAICHI   Sun Sep 11, 2011 6:50 am




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PostSubject: Re: DRAHON BALL Z ULTIMATE TENAKAICHI   Tue Sep 20, 2011 1:21 am






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PostSubject: Re: DRAHON BALL Z ULTIMATE TENAKAICHI   Tue Oct 04, 2011 3:36 am

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PostSubject: Re: DRAHON BALL Z ULTIMATE TENAKAICHI   Thu Oct 06, 2011 12:30 am

Console games[edit] 1980sDragon Ball: Dragon Daihikyō


JPN September 27, 1986
– Super Cassette Vision Notes:
Dragon Ball: Dragon Daihikyō (ドラゴンボール ドラゴン大秘境, Doragon Bōru: Dragon Daihikyō?, Dragon Ball: Dragon's Great Exploration)The first Dragon Ball video game ever produced. It was released by Epoch, making it the only game not to feature any kind of involvement with Bandai or the subsequent Namco Bandai. The game is an overhead shoot'em up that allows players to take on the role of Son Goku who rides on the Nimbus while firing Ki blasts and swatting at enemies with his Power Pole.




Dragon Ball: Shenlong no Nazo

Dragon Power

Dragon Ball


JPN November 27, 1986


NA March 1988


EU 1992
– Family Computer (Nintendo Entertainment System) Notes:
Known in Japan as Dragon Ball: Shenlong no Nazo (ドラゴンボール 神龍の謎, Doragon Bōru: Shenron no Nazo?, Riddle of Shenlong), in France as Dragon Ball: Le Secret du Dragon and in Spain as Dragon Ball, the game was developed by TOSE Software Company and released by Bandai in 1986. The game stars Son Goku and very roughly follows the first two volumes of the Dragon Ball manga, culminating in the first wish from Shenlong. The game consists of 2D overhead areas where Goku must fight many enemies and side scrolling sequences for the boss fights. It was added as bonus feature in the Japanese release of Dragon Ball: Origins 2 in 2010.
In the USA the game is known as Dragon Power. Although the Japanese, French and Spanish editions of the game used the familiar art and music from the Dragon Ball anime, the US version is stated to be based on Journey to the West with no mention of Dragon Ball.[2] Goku was changed to more closely resemble an Americanized Kung Fu stereotype, being pictured on the box with a white gi and blue headband. Master Roshi has been similarly changed to look more like a traditional martial arts master. Bulma is called "Nora", Yamcha is called "Lancer", Oolong is called "Pudgy", the Kamehameha is the "Wind Wave", and the Dragon Balls are referred to as "Crystalballs".
The European version, released in France and Spain in 1992, retains the Dragon Ball license. In France, it was the first Nintendo game translated into French. However this translation includes a lot of misspellings. In Spain, the game was also released in French language, although the Spanish version specifically featured box description and instruction manual translations in Spanish language.



Dragon Ball: Daimaō Fukkatsu


JPN August 12, 1988
– Family Computer Notes:
Dragon Ball: Daimaō Fukkatsu (ドラゴンボール大魔王復活, Doragon Bōru Daimaō Fukkatsu?, lit. Dragon Ball: Great Demon King's Revival) was released in Japan for the Family Computer (Famicom) on August 12, 1988 by Bandai. It takes place during the Piccolo Daimao Saga. It was one of the first games to have a board game, which included battles using cards. The battle card games are a hybrid of role playing games, board games and trading cards. The players move around a game board and encounter characters on the way. Some characters offer information and others need to be battled. The outcome of each fight is determined by the randomly generated hand of cards players and the opponent are dealt. The player flips over cards in a certain order, and their actions are shown in an animated battle that lasts until one of the characters is defeated.




Dragon Ball 3: Goku Den


JPN October 27, 1989
– Family Computer Notes:
Dragon Ball 3: Goku Den (ドラゴンボール3 悟空伝, Doragon Bōru Surī Gokūden?, lit. Dragon Ball 3: Goku's Story) was released by Bandai on October 27, 1989 for the Famicom in Japan. The game relates all of the Dragon Ball story until the fight against Piccolo Junior. The main character is Goku as a child and adult, though Krillin and Yamcha are also playable. A remake was released for the WonderSwan in 2002.





[edit] 1990sDragon Ball Z: Kyτshū! Saiyan


JPN October 27, 1990
– Family Computer Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Kyτshū! Saiyan (ドラゴンボールZ 強襲!サイヤ人, Doragon Bōru Zetto Kyōshū! Saiyajin?, Dragon Ball Z: Fierce Attack! Saiyan) was the first Dragon Ball Z game to be released for the Nintendo Famicom system. It was released by Bandai on October 27, 1990 in Japan. The game features Brocco, Pumpkin (two illusion Saiyans who fight Yamcha and Tien in the anime) and Onion (an original who transforms into a Giant Ape).




Dragon Ball Z II: Gekishin Freeza


JPN August 10, 1991
– Family Computer Notes:
Dragon Ball Z II: Gekishin Freeza!! (ドラゴンボールZII 激神フリーザ!!, Doragon Bōru Zetto Tsū Gekishin Furīza!!?, Dragon Ball Z II: Freeza the Planet Destroyer!!) was released by Bandai on August 10, 1991 in Japan for the Famicom. The game features the story on Namek and follows closely to the story in the anime except for the fact that, like in the previous game, Tenshinhan, Yamcha and Chaozu are not dead but are present in the player's party at the beginning.




Dragon Ball Z: Super Saiya Densetsu

– Super Famicom Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Super Saiya Densetsu (ドラゴンボールZ 超サイヤ伝説, Doragon Bōru Zetto Sūpā Saiya Densetsu?, Dragon Ball Z: Legend of the Super Saiyan) is the first Dragon Ball game for the Super Famicom. It is a remake combining two earlier Famicom games: Dragon Ball Z: Kyτshū! Saiyan and Dragon Ball Z II: Gekishin Freeza.




Dragon Ball Z III: Ressen Jinzōningen


JPN August 7, 1992
– Family Computer Notes:
Dragon Ball Z III: Ressen Jinzōningen (ドラゴンボールZIII 烈戦人造人間, Doragon Bōru Zetto Surī Ressen Jinzōningen?, Dragon Ball Z III: Hot Battle! Artificial Humans!) released August 7, 1992 in Japan for the Family Computer by Bandai.




Dragon Ball Z: Gekitō Tenkaichi Budokai

– Family Computer Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Gekitō Tenkaichi Budokai (ドラゴンボールZ 激闘天下一武道会, Doragon Bōru Zetto Gekitō Tenkaichi Budōkai?) was released only in Japan on December 29, 1992 for the Family Computer by Bandai. The game was unique in that it came with a special card reader attachment, the Datach Joint Rom System, which required several character cards to be swiped in order to select a character.




Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden

Dragon Ball Z

– Super Famicom Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden (ドラゴンボールZ 超武闘伝, Doragon Bōru Zetto Sūpā Butōden?, Dragon Ball Z: Super Fighting Story) is the first installment in the Super Butōden series. The game was released in Japan on March 20, 1993 and in France and Spain on November 30, 1993. In France and Spain the game is simply called Dragon Ball Z and is often referred as Dragon Ball Z 1. Super Butōden features 10 playable characters and its story mode spans from the final saga of Dragon Ball to the conclusion of the Cell Games.




Dragon Ball Z Gaiden: Saiyajin Zetsumetsu Keikaku

– Family Computer Notes:
Dragon Ball Z Gaiden: Saiyajin Zetsumetsu Keikaku (ドラゴンボールZ外伝 サイヤ人絶滅計画, Doragon Bōru Zetto Gaiden Saiyajin Zetsumetsu Keikaku?, Dragon Ball Z Side Story: Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans) was released for the Famicom on August 6, 1993.[3] Gameplay takes the form of a card battle RPG, where the player's movement and battle choices are dictated by the randomly generated playing cards the player receives. Multiplayer is a six player tournament using difficulty level of computer players that are in the save file. Players can choose between Goku, Gohan, Piccolo, Trunks and Vegeta. Winner records are kept in the game data, as well as any moves the player might learn.

The game follows, Dr. Raichi, a survivor of the Tuffle race annihilated by the Saiyans. Raichi manages to escape from the planet with a ship containing Hatchhyack, a super computer able to create "Ghost images" of other warriors, though he is killed soon after. Hatchhyack creates a ghost image of him to get revenge on the surviving Saiyans. He places machines that emit a gas capable of destroying life on Earth, so Goku, Gohan, Vegeta, Future Trunks, and Piccolo rush to destroy the devices located around the planet. They manage to destroy all but one that is protected by an impenetrable energy barrier and guarded by ghost warriors of Frieza, Cooler, Turles, and Lord Slug, which have to be killed in the same way as the originals. They eventually track down Raichi, defeat him, and learn of Hatchhyack, who absorbs Raichi's hatred and materializes in an android body. Hatchhyack devastates the heroes until the Saiyans, after having transformed into their Super Saiyan states, combine their powers together into one massive wave of energy, ending the threat of the ghost warriors.




Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden 2

Dragon Ball Z: la Lιgende Saien

Dragon Ball Z: La Leyenda de Saien

– Super Famicom Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden 2 (ドラゴンボールZ 超武闘伝2, Doragon Bōru Zetto Sūpā Butōden Tsū?, Dragon Ball Z: Super Fighting Story 2), called Dragon Ball Z: la Lιgende Saien in France and Dragon Ball Z: La Leyenda de Saien in Spain, is the second installment in the Super Butōden series. The game was released in Japan on December 17, 1993 and in France and Spain in 1994. Super Butōden 2 features 10 playable characters (8 normal, 2 unlockable with a code) and its story mode covers the Cell Games, as well as several stories involving Bojack, Zangya, and Broli completely unrelated to the movies they hail from. For unknown reasons, these three characters were renamed Kujila, Aki, and Tara in the French version, respectively.

Depending on if the player wins or loses a battle, the story will take a different turn in the Story Mode, which leads to a lot of possibilities to experience.

This is the only Dragon Ball Z fighting game in which Goku is not readily playable. A code is required in the Japanese version to unlock him and Broly, the other hidden character. This is not necessary in the European versions, as both characters are already unlocked.




Dragon Ball Z: Buyū Retsuden

Dragon Ball Z: L'Appel du Destin

1994 – Mega Drive Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Buyū Retsuden (ドラゴンボールZ 武勇列伝, Doragon Bōru Zetto Buyū Retsuden?, Dragon Ball Z: Intense Martial Transmission), released as Dragon Ball Z: L'Appel du Destin (Dragon Ball Z: The Call of Destiny?) in France and Spain and as Dragon Ball Z in Portugal, is a fighting game released for the Mega Drive. It was released in Japan on April 1, 1994 (1994-04-01)[4] and Europe in 1994. The playable characters are Goku, Gohan, Krillin, Piccolo, Vegeta, Captain Ginyu, Recoome, Frieza, Future Trunks, Android 18, and Cell.




Dragon Ball Z: Shin Saiyajin Zenmetsu Keikaku — Chikyū-Hen

– Playdia Notes:
Dragon Ball Z Gaiden: Saiyan Zetsumetsu Keikaku Chikyū-Hen (ドラゴンボールZ外伝 真サイヤ人絶滅計画 地球編, Doragon Bōru Zetto Gaiden Shin Saiyajin Zetsumetsu Keikaku Chikyū-Hen?, Dragon Ball Z Side Story: True Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans: Earth Edition) is part one in the Saiyan Zenmetsu Keikaku series for the Playdia. The game was released on September 23, 1994.[5]




Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden 3

Dragon Ball Z: Ultime Menace

Dragon Ball Z: La Ultima Amenaza

– Super Famicom Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden 3 (ドラゴンボールZ 超武闘伝3, Doragon Bōru Zetto Sūpā Butōden Surī?, Dragon Ball Z: Super Fighting Story 3), called Dragon Ball Z: Ultime Menace in France and Dragon Ball Z: La Ultima Amenaza in Spain, is the third installment in the Super Butōden series. The game was released in Japan on September 29, 1994 and in France and Spain in 1994. Super Butōden 3 features ten playable characters. It is the only game in the series that lacks a story mode.

The game has 10 characters, 9 normal and 1 hidden. The hidden character, Future Trunks, can be unlocked with a code.




Dragon Ball Z: Idainaru Son Goku Densetsu

– PC Engine Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Idainaru Son Goku Densetsu (ドラゴンボールZ 偉大なる孫悟空伝説, Doragon Bōru Zetto Idainaru Son Gokū Densetsu?, Dragon Ball Z: The Greatest Son Goku Legend) was released for the PC Engine (the Japanese version of the TurboGrafx-16) on November 11, 1994 (1994-11-11). It features Gohan telling Goten of the battles of their deceased father, Goku, along with other characters. The game illustrates Goku's seven greatest battles: Fighting Tao Pai Pai, challenging Tenshinhan at the Tenkaichi Budokai, destroying Piccolo Daimao, fighting Piccolo at the Tenkaichi Budokai, protecting Earth from Vegeta, saving Namek from Frieza, and sacrificing his life to save the world from Perfect Cell.




Dragon Ball Z Gaiden: Saiyajin Zetsumetsu Keikaku~Uchū-Hen

– Playdia Notes:
Dragon Ball Z Gaiden: Saiyan Zetsumetsu Keikaku~Uchū-Hen (ドラゴンボールZ外伝 真サイヤ人絶滅計画 宇宙編, Doragon Bōru Zetto Gaiden Shin Saiyajin Zetsumetsu Keikaku Uchū-Hen?, Dragon Ball Z Side Story: True Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans: Universe Edition) is part two in the Saiyan Zenmetsu Keikaku series. The game was released on December 16, 1994.[6]




Dragon Ball Z: Super Goku Den — Totsugeki-Hen

– Super Famicom Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Super Goku Den — Totsugeki-Hen was released on March 24, 1995.[7] Totsugeki-Hen chronicles the adventures of Goku and his adventures through the start of Dragon Ball all the way to the final battle with Piccolo Daimao.




Dragon Ball Z: Ultimate Battle 22

– PlayStation Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Ultimate Battle 22 (ドラゴンボールZ アルティメイトバトル22, Doragon Bōru Zetto Arutimeito Batoru Towintetzū?) is a fighting game released July 28, 1995 (1995-07-28) in Japan (re-released as a Greatest Hit game on December 6, 1995 (1995-12-06)), released in Europe on July 1996 (1996-07), and released in North America years later on March 25, 2003 (2003-03-25). The game features cel drawings from the animators as character sprites and three dimensional backgrounds. The playable characters are Goku, Gohan, Vegeta, Future Trunks, Cell, Android 16, Android 18, Frieza, Zarbon, Recoome, Captain Ginyu, Dabura, Goten, Kid Trunks, Supreme Kai, Majin Buu (Good), Super Buu, Super Saiyan Gotenks, Great Saiyaman, Krillin, Tien, and Piccolo. Unlockable characters include Gogeta, Hercule, Master Roshi, Super Saiyan 3 Goku, and Kid Goku.

Ultimate Battle 22 was the subject of an overwhelming number of negative American reviews. GameSpot give it a 1.2/10, calling it a "really, really terrible game." X-Play said it was "a waste of time and money." Official PlayStation Magazine gave it a 1/5, the second lowest score possible. Electronic Gaming Monthly said that "someone crapped in a jewel case and passed it off as a game." Overall, it has a 32% on Game Rankings.




Dragon Ball Z: Super Goku Den — Kakusei-Hen

– Super Famicom Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Super Goku Den — Kakusei-Hen is the second game in the Super Gokuden series. The game was released on September 22, 1995.[8] Kakusei-Hen follows the story of Goku from his fight with Piccolo at the 23rd World Tournament to his final battle with Freeza after the latter had reached the Super Saiyan state.




Dragon Ball Z: Shin Butōden

– Sega Saturn Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Shin Super Butōden (ドラゴンボールZ 真武闘伝, Doragon Bōru Zetto Shin Butōden?, Dragon Ball Z: True Fighting Story) is the fourth installment in the Super Butōden series. The game was released only in Japan on November 17, 1995. The game features 27 playable characters, their sprites being those used in an earlier Dragon Ball Z game, Dragon Ball Z: Ultimate Battle 22. Its story mode ranges from the Android Saga to the Cell Games.

Shin Butōden also features two other exclusive modes: Group Battle and Mr. Satan mode. In Group Battle, players gets to create a team of five characters and fight against either another player or an AI-controlled character. In Mr. Satan mode, Mr. Satan is trying to raise enough money to pay off his debt to Artificial Human 18, and the player places bets on matches and cheats by using several items, such as banana peels, guns, and dynamite.




Dragon Ball Z: Hyper Dimension

– Super Famicom Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Hyper Dimension (ドラゴンボールZ ハイパー ディメンション, Doragon Bōru Zetto Haipā Dimenshon?) is the last Dragon Ball Z fighting game released for the Super Famicom/SNES in Japan and Europe. It was released in Japan on March 29, 1996 (1996-03-29) and in France and Spain in December 1996. The game features a story mode that begins from the Freeza Saga and ends at the Buu Saga. The amount of life for characters is measured by a number system from 1 to 999, which can be charged at any time during the match. When the life reaches a level below 80, the characters are able to perform "desperate moves", which cause a large amount of damage. The characters fight on a multi-tier stage, which allows opponents to hit each other to other stages. The playable characters are Goku, Vegeta, Gohan, Perfect Cell, Piccolo, Vegetto, Frieza, Majin Buu, Kid Buu, and Gotenks.




Dragon Ball Z: Idainaru Dragon Ball Densetsu

Dragon Ball Z: The Legend

– PlayStation, Sega Saturn Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: The Legend, known as Dragon Ball Z: Idainaru Dragon Ball Densetsu (ドラゴンボールZ 偉大なるドラゴンボール伝説, Doragon Bōru Zetto Idainaru Doragon Bōru Densetsu?, Dragon Ball Z: The Greatest Dragon Ball Legend) in Japan, is a fighting game produced and released by Bandai on March 31, 1996 in Japan, released for the Sega Saturn and PlayStation. Greatest Hits versions were released on June 20, 1997 for the Saturn and June 27, 1997 for the PlayStation. In Europe, only the Sega Saturn version was released in France and Spain in late 1996, with the French edition retaining the original Japanese name and the Spanish edition being re-adressed as Dragon Ball Z: The Legend.

The game utilizes a unique system of play that is different from most other fighters. The graphics feature 2-D sprites in a three dimensional world. Although each battle begins on the ground, the majority of the action is featured skyward. The characters fly around each and utilize rapid punches and kicks, and ki blasts, either singularly or rapidly by holding the assigned button for a short period. The characters have a limited amount of ki that can be charged over time. If the player uses all of their available ki their character will stop fighting out of exhaustion, leaving them wide open for an attack. The life meter is a scale made up of energy from both sides that shifts depending on damage taken, and after one side is depleted, the character performs a special "Meteo Attack", which takes place in a cut scene and finishes of the opponent. Each match is made up of two teams that can include one fighter or multiple fighters that can be switched out at various times.




Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout


JP August 21, 1997 (1997-08-21)
NA October 1, 1997 (1997-10-01)
EU November 2, 1997 (1997-11-02)
JP July 23, 1998 (1998-07-23) (Greatest Hits)
NA August 24, 2004 (2004-08-24) (Reprint)
EU October 4, 2002 (2002-10-04) (Reprint)
– PlayStation



[edit] 2000sDragon Ball Z: Budokai

– PlayStation 2, Nintendo GameCube


Dragon Ball Z: Budokai 2

– PlayStation 2, Nintendo GameCube


Dragon Ball Z: Budokai 3

– PlayStation 2


Dragon Ball Z: Sagas


NA March 22, 2005
– PlayStation 2, Xbox, Nintendo GameCube


Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi

– PlayStation 2


Super Dragon Ball Z

– Arcade, PlayStation 2


Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi 2

– PlayStation 2, Wii


Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi 3

– PlayStation 2, Wii


Dragon Ball Z: Burst Limit

– PlayStation 3, Xbox 360


Dragon Ball Z: Infinite World

– PlayStation 2


Dragon Ball: Revenge of King Piccolo

– Wii Notes:
Released in Japan as Dragon Ball: World's Greatest Adventure (ドラゴンボール天下一大冒険, Doragon Bōru Tenka-ichi Dai-Bōken?)[9]




Dragon Ball: Raging Blast

– PlayStation 3, Xbox 360


Dragon Ball: Raging Blast 2

– PlayStation 3, Xbox 360


Dragon Ball: Zenkai Battle Royale

– Arcade Notes:
First arcade game that uses GGPO middleware for network/internet play.




Dragon Ball Z: Ultimate Tenkaichi

Oct 25, 2011 – PlayStation 3, Xbox 360



[edit] Portable gamesDragon Ball Z: Goku Hishōden

– Game Boy Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Goku Hishōden (ドラゴンボールZ: 悟空 飛翔伝, Doragon Bōru Zetto: Gokū Hishōden?) is the first installment in the Goku RPG series, released on November 25, 1994.[citation needed] Despite the title, the game starts out during the end of Dragon Ball with Son Goku's fight with Piccolo at the World Martial Arts Tournament and ends with the battle against Vegeta in Dragon Ball Z.




Dragon Ball Z: Goku Gekitōden

– Game Boy Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Goku Gekitōden (ドラゴンボールZ: 悟空激闘伝, Doragon Bōru Zetto: Gokū Gekitōden?) is the second installment in the Goku RPG series, released on August 25, 1995.[citation needed] It features five playable characters, as well as Son Goku's Super Saiyan transformation. Goku Gekitōden takes place immeditately after Son Goku's battle with Vegeta, and ends with Son Goku's final battle with Frieza.

In Goku Gekitōden, moving about and fighting is real time, unlike its predecessor. The game also features many extras, such as minigames and a tournament mode. Most characters from the Namek Saga can be fought during the story mode, including ones such as Zarbon and Frieza's transformed states.




Dragon Ball Z: Collectible Card Game


NA May 29, 2002
– Game Boy Advance Notes:
Dragon Ball Z Collectible Card Game was released on May 29, 2002 by Atari. It is based on the Dragon Ball Z Collectible Card Game.




Dragon Ball Z: Legendary Super Warriors

– Game Boy Color Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Legendary Super Warriors (ドラゴンボールZ 伝説の超戦士たち, Doragon Bōru Zetto Densetsu no Chō Senshi Tachi?) is a turn-based strategy game developed and released for the Game Boy Color by Banpresto. It was released in North America on June 30, 2002 (2002-06-30), Japan on August 9, 2002 (2002-08-09), and Europe on November 2002 (2002-11). It is played with the use of in-game cards for attacks, techniques and support items. The game’s story takes place from the start of Dragon Ball Z, the Saiyan Saga, and runs until the end of the Buu Saga. The game also includes two extra stories involving Future Trunks's timeline. The game boasts a large array of characters and forms for the various characters. The first playthrough selects one or two characters for each battle, and subsequent playthroughs allow the player to select various unlockable characters for any scenario.




Dragon Ball Z: The Legacy of Goku


NA May 14, 2002
– Game Boy Advance


Dragon Ball Z: The Legacy of Goku II


NA July 17, 2003
– Game Boy Advance


Dragon Ball


JPN November 20, 2003
– Wonderswan Notes:
Remake of the third Dragon Ball game for the Family Computer.







Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors


JPN March 26, 2004
– Game Boy Advance


Dragon Ball Z: Buu's Fury


NA September 14, 2004
– Game Boy Advance


Dragon Ball: Advanced Adventure


JPN November 18, 2004
– Game Boy Advance


Dragon Ball GT: Transformation


NA August 9, 2005
– Game Boy Advance


Dragon Ball Z: Supersonic Warriors 2


NA November 20, 2005
– Nintendo DS


Dragon Ball Z: Shin Budokai


JPN April 26, 2006
– PlayStation Portable


Dragonradar Mobile


JPN January 2007
– LCD game Notes:
Dragonradar Mobile (ドラゴンレーダーモバイル, Doragon Rēdā Mobairu?) is a handheld LCD game that is produced by Bandai exclusively in Japan on January 2007 (2007-01). The game is featured in the shape of the dragon radar from the series and comes in either the standard white or orange colors which are listed as "Dragonradar Mobile: White" and "Dragonradar Mobile: Orange". The game features two distinct modes of play, a battle game and a search game. The game controls are determined by the player's hand movement by a motion device, and features a "accelerometer" that determines the strength of the players attacks by how hard the player shakes the device. Players can also compete with other players courtesy of an infrared sensor which can detect other radars for two player mode.




Dragon Ball Z: Harukanaru Densetsu


JPN March 21, 2007
– Nintendo DS


Dragon Ball Z: Shin Budokai - Another Road


JPN June 7, 2007
– PlayStation Portable


Dragon Ball: Origins


JPN September 18, 2008
– Nintendo DS


Dragonball Evolution


NA March 2009
– PlayStation Portable


Dragon Ball Z: Attack of the Saiyans


JPN May 21, 2009
– Nintendo DS


Dragon Ball: Origins 2


JPN February 11, 2010
USA June 22, 2010
– Nintendo DS


Dragon Ball Z: Tenkaichi Tag Team


JPN September 30, 2010
USA October 19, 2010
– PlayStation Portable Notes:
Tenkaichi Tag Team is a two vs. two PSP fighter. Players can play alone or multiplayer via Ad Hoc. It includes modes such as Dragon Walker, Battle 100, and Survival Mode. Dragon Walker Mode takes fans through the entire epic Dragon Ball Z story arc from the Saiyan saga to the Majin Buu saga. Battle 100 Mode tasks players to relive the most epic encounters and newly created situations from the Dragon Ball Z world in ever increasingly difficult situations. Tenkaichi Tag Team will also have more than 70 playable and customizable characters.[citation needed]




Dragon Ball Kai: Ultimate Butoden


JPN February 3, 2011
– Nintendo DS



[edit] Arcade gamesDragon Ball Z

Original release date(s):
1993 Release years by system:

Notes:
Dragon Ball Z (ドラゴンボールZ, Doragon Bōru Zetto?) is a fighting game designed and manufactured in Japan by Banpresto in 1993. The game's cabinet is shaped like a robot with markings similar to Goku's gi. The game features large sprites and a color palete that is identical Toriyama's water color scheme in the manga. The environments are semi destructible as chunks of wall or ground could be destroyed. The controls are unique as most of the characters movements are flight related. The playable characters are Goku, Super Saiyan Goku, Gohan, Vegeta, Piccolo, Frieza, Captain Ginyu, Recoome, and Burter




Dragon Ball Z 2: Super Battle

1994 – Arcade Notes:
Dragon Ball Z 2: Super Battle (ドラゴンボールZ 2 スパーバトル, Doragon Bōru Zetto Tsū Supā Batoru?) the sequel to Dragon Ball Z released in 1994, also produced by Banpresto. The gameplay matches the Butōden series of games rather than the previous arcade game. The characters are Goku, Gohan, Vegeta, Future Trunks, Piccolo, Cell, Android 16, Android 18, Android 20, and Mr. Satan.




Dragon Ball Z: V.R.V.S.

Original release date(s):
1994 Release years by system:

Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: V.R.V.S. is a fighting game released in 1994 for the Sega System 32 arcade platform by Sega and Banpresto. Although the game is in 2D, it uses camera angles positioned behind the characters to create a 3D-like experience. The game is controlled with a joysick and 3 buttons; a deluxe edition of the game features motion sensors that allow the player to move his or her body to control the character in the game. The object of the game is to defeat six opponents. The playable characters are Goku, Gohan, Piccolo, Vegeta, and Future Trunks. The final boss is an original character named Ozotto.




Super Dragon Ball Z

Original release date(s):
December 22, 2005 Release years by system:

Notes:
Same game that was later ported to the PlayStation 2.




Data Carddass Dragon Ball Z

Original release date(s):
Release years by system:




Data Carddass Dragon Ball Z 2

Original release date(s):
April 2006 Release years by system:




Dragon Ball Z: Bakuretsu Impact

Original release date(s):
March 16, 2007 Release years by system:

Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: Bakuretsu Impact (ドラゴンボールZ 爆烈インパクト, Doragon Bōru Zetto Bakuretsu Inpakuto?, Dragon Ball Z: Burst Impact) is the third card-based fighting game for Bandai's Data Carddass arcade system. It was developed by Dimps and released on March 16, 2007 in Japan only by Bandai.




Dragon Ball Z: W Bakuretsu Impact

Original release date(s):
May 14, 2008 Release years by system:

Notes:
Dragon Ball Z: W Bakuretsu Impact (ドラゴンボールZ W爆烈インパクト, Doragon Bōru Zetto Daburu Bakuretsu Inpakuto?, Dragon Ball Z: W Burst Impact) is the fourth card-based fighting game released on Bandai's Data Carddass arcade system. The playable characters are Goku, Gohan, Vegeta, Piccolo, Kid Goku, Pan, Future Trunks, Goten, Gotenks, Arale, Majin Buu, Super Buu, Kid Buu, Broly, Super 17, Nova Shenron, Omega Shenron, and Mighty Mask.





[edit] PC gamesDragon Ball Online

2010 – PC
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PostSubject: Re: DRAHON BALL Z ULTIMATE TENAKAICHI   Thu Oct 06, 2011 12:43 am

1. Goku (SSJ, SSJ2, SSJ3)
2. Kid Gohan
3. Piccolo
4. Krillin
5. Yamcha
6. Trunks (SSJ, USSJ)
7. Teen Gohan (SSJ, SSJ2)
8. Vegeta (SSJ, USSJ, SSJ2, SSJ4)
9. Tien
10. Chiaotzu
11. Gohan (SSJ, SSJ2, Elder Kai Unlocked Ability)
12. Goten (SSJ)
13. Kid Trunks (SSJ)
14. Gotenks (SSJ, SSJ3)
15. Vegito (SSJ)
16. Gogeta (SSJ4)
17. Goku (GT) (SSJ, SSJ3, SSJ4)
18. Future Gohan (SSJ)
19. Videl
20. Hercule
21. Uub (Majuub)
22. Pan
23. Nail
24. Supreme Kai (Kibito Kai)
25. Raditz
26. Nappa
27. Saibaman
28. Captain Ginyu
29. Recoome
30. Burter
31. Jeice
32. Guldo
33. Zarbon (Post-Transformation)
34. Dodoria
35. Frieza (Second Form, Third Form, Final Form, 100% Full Power)
36. Cui
37. King Cold
38. King Vegeta
39. Cell (2nd Form, Perfect Form, Super Perfect Form)
40. Cell Jr.
41. Dr. Gero
42. Android #19
43. Android #18
44. Android #17
45. Android #16
46. Majin Buu
47. Super Buu (Gotenks Absorbed, Gohan Absorbed)
48. Kid Buu
49. Demon King Dabura
50. Bardock
51. Garlic Jr. (Super Garlic Jr.)
52. Turles
53. Lord Slug
54. Salza
55. Cooler (Final Form)
56. Meta-Cooler
57. Android 13 (Super Android 13)
58. Broly (SSJ, LSSJ)
59. Zangya
60. Bojack
61. Janemba
62. Pikkon
63. Tapion
64. Baby Vegeta (Super Baby, Super Baby 2)
65. Super 17
66. Nuova Shenron
67. Syn Shenron (Omega Shenron)


The character list from B3 not including DB characters, characters who can't fly, duplicate characters, and taking out useless characters like Appule and Freeza solider. This is of course only a an edit of BT3's list so there could be swaps of some characters for others.
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PostSubject: Re: DRAHON BALL Z ULTIMATE TENAKAICHI   

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